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First aid for non-battle injuries

Series Title(s):
War Department official film
Contributor(s):
United States. Army. Signal Corps.
Publication:
[Washington, DC] : War Dept., 1943
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
Subject(s):
First Aid -- methods
Military Medicine
Genre(s):
Animation
Abstract:
In this film, the elementary principles of first aid for soldiers in the field are presented. The emphasis is on what the soldier should do before medical help arrives. He is shown how to put everyday objects and personal items to good use in emergency situations. The film is narrated over footage of soldiers in the field. In the aftermath of a road accident in which an army truck overturns, injuring several men, the first aid treatment of wounds and fractures is addressed.Soldiers are shown giving first aid to a man with a possible broken back, a man with a bleeding flesh wound of the thigh, and another with a fractured forearm. In another scenario, a soldier falls from a tree and breaks his leg. His buddies fashion splints from boards to keep the leg immobile until medical help arrives. A soldier shocked by a downed live wire is removed from contact with the wire and given artificial respiration until he begins to breathe on his own. A drowning victim first has his lungs drained of water and then is given artificial respiration. When a camp cook is scalded with hot water, other soldiers cut the clothing away from his body, apply ointment from a first aid kit to his burns, and give him eight "wound tablets" with plenty of water. His hips and feet are elevated, and he is kept warm to prevent shock. A soldier is shown removing a splinter from his finger with a pocket knife after he has flamed the blade with a match. He then swabs the wound with iodine and puts a bandage over it. A soldier suffering from heat exhaustion is placed in the shade, has his field gear removed and his clothing loosened, and is given cool salt water to drink. A soldier with a tick on his leg removes it by holding a lighted cigarette close to the insect. The tick bite is then painted with iodine. A soldier whose arms and hands have been in contact with poison ivy washes long and hard with "G.I. soap." A soldier with dirt in his eye tries to remove it by tearing. When that is not successful, another soldier pulls down his lower lid, then rolls his upper lid over a match stick and removes the particles with the corner of a clean handkerchief. A soldier has an insect in his ear. His buddy pours small amounts of water from a canteen into the ear to drown the insect. A soldier with abdominal pain wants to take a laxative, but his buddy persuades him to see the medical officer because that pain may indicate appendicitis. In the field, a soldier is bitten by a poisonous snake. His buddies apply a handkerchief tourniquet, flame the blade of a pocket knife, make cross-cuts over each fang mark, and thoroughly suck out the wound by mouth.
Copyright:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain. (More information)
Extent:
026 min.
Color:
Black and white
Sound:
Sound
Provenance:
Received: June 27, 1956 as a donation from the Veterans Administration.
Technique:
Live action
NLM Unique ID:
9300500A (See catalog record)
OCLC no.:
71233207
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Series Title(s):
War Department official film
Contributor(s):
United States. Army. Signal Corps.
Publication:
[Washington, DC] : War Dept., 1943
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
Subject(s):
First Aid -- methods
Military Medicine
Genre(s):
Animation
Abstract:
In this film, the elementary principles of first aid for soldiers in the field are presented. The emphasis is on what the soldier should do before medical help arrives. He is shown how to put everyday objects and personal items to good use in emergency situations. The film is narrated over footage of soldiers in the field. In the aftermath of a road accident in which an army truck overturns, injuring several men, the first aid treatment of wounds and fractures is addressed.Soldiers are shown giving first aid to a man with a possible broken back, a man with a bleeding flesh wound of the thigh, and another with a fractured forearm. In another scenario, a soldier falls from a tree and breaks his leg. His buddies fashion splints from boards to keep the leg immobile until medical help arrives. A soldier shocked by a downed live wire is removed from contact with the wire and given artificial respiration until he begins to breathe on his own. A drowning victim first has his lungs drained of water and then is given artificial respiration. When a camp cook is scalded with hot water, other soldiers cut the clothing away from his body, apply ointment from a first aid kit to his burns, and give him eight "wound tablets" with plenty of water. His hips and feet are elevated, and he is kept warm to prevent shock. A soldier is shown removing a splinter from his finger with a pocket knife after he has flamed the blade with a match. He then swabs the wound with iodine and puts a bandage over it. A soldier suffering from heat exhaustion is placed in the shade, has his field gear removed and his clothing loosened, and is given cool salt water to drink. A soldier with a tick on his leg removes it by holding a lighted cigarette close to the insect. The tick bite is then painted with iodine. A soldier whose arms and hands have been in contact with poison ivy washes long and hard with "G.I. soap." A soldier with dirt in his eye tries to remove it by tearing. When that is not successful, another soldier pulls down his lower lid, then rolls his upper lid over a match stick and removes the particles with the corner of a clean handkerchief. A soldier has an insect in his ear. His buddy pours small amounts of water from a canteen into the ear to drown the insect. A soldier with abdominal pain wants to take a laxative, but his buddy persuades him to see the medical officer because that pain may indicate appendicitis. In the field, a soldier is bitten by a poisonous snake. His buddies apply a handkerchief tourniquet, flame the blade of a pocket knife, make cross-cuts over each fang mark, and thoroughly suck out the wound by mouth.
Copyright:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain. (More information)
Extent:
026 min.
Color:
Black and white
Sound:
Sound
Provenance:
Received: June 27, 1956 as a donation from the Veterans Administration.
Technique:
Live action
NLM Unique ID:
9300500A (See catalog record)
OCLC no.:
71233207