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Recent modifications of convulsive shock therapy

Contributor(s):
Bennett, Abram Elting, 1898-1985
Cash, Paul T.
University of Nebraska at Omaha. Department of Neurology and Psychiatry.
Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital (Omaha, Neb.). Psychiatric Department
Publication:
[Omaha, NE] : The Departments, [1941]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
Subject(s):
Convulsive Therapy -- adverse effects
Convulsive Therapy -- methods
Curare -- therapeutic use
Fractures, Bone -- prevention & control
Mood Disorders -- therapy
Pentylenetetrazole -- therapeutic use
Quinine -- therapeutic use
Genre(s):
Instructional Films and Videos
Abstract:
Convulsive shock's usefulness in treating affective disorders is discussed. Metrazol convulsions have been the most popular method, but spinal and extremity fractures made it hazardous until preliminary curare therapy markedly softened the convulsions. A case of manic excitement is shown to illustrate the curare-metrazol therapy. Good results are usually seen after six to eight treatments. A second treatment using quinine methochloride instead of curare is shown. Metho-quinine and metrazol may be administered simultaneously. Post-treatment apnea is more prolonged with curare. Advocates of electro-shock therapy claim that the patient fears it less, loses consciousness instantly, and has softer convulsions. The seizure, however, is still severe and fractures occur. Preliminary curarization will prevent trauma in electro-shock therapy. Shots include: patients receiving curare, quinine methochloride, metrazol, and electro-shock; patients having strong and soft seizures; reactions to the therapies being pointed out; a nurse mixing methoquinine and metrazol; the electro-shock apparatus; and an X-ray of a patient injured during a strong seizure. Shot in Omaha, Nebraska.
Copyright:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain. (More information)
Extent:
017 min.
Color:
Color
Sound:
Silent
Credits:
Services of A.E. Bennett and P.T. Cash.
Provenance:
Received: Oct. 3, 1985 as a donation from the Univ. of Pittsburgh, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinical Library.
Technique:
Live action
NLM Unique ID:
8800321A (See catalog record)
OCLC no.:
31660379
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Contributor(s):
Bennett, Abram Elting, 1898-1985
Cash, Paul T.
University of Nebraska at Omaha. Department of Neurology and Psychiatry.
Bishop Clarkson Memorial Hospital (Omaha, Neb.). Psychiatric Department
Publication:
[Omaha, NE] : The Departments, [1941]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
Subject(s):
Convulsive Therapy -- adverse effects
Convulsive Therapy -- methods
Curare -- therapeutic use
Fractures, Bone -- prevention & control
Mood Disorders -- therapy
Pentylenetetrazole -- therapeutic use
Quinine -- therapeutic use
Genre(s):
Instructional Films and Videos
Abstract:
Convulsive shock's usefulness in treating affective disorders is discussed. Metrazol convulsions have been the most popular method, but spinal and extremity fractures made it hazardous until preliminary curare therapy markedly softened the convulsions. A case of manic excitement is shown to illustrate the curare-metrazol therapy. Good results are usually seen after six to eight treatments. A second treatment using quinine methochloride instead of curare is shown. Metho-quinine and metrazol may be administered simultaneously. Post-treatment apnea is more prolonged with curare. Advocates of electro-shock therapy claim that the patient fears it less, loses consciousness instantly, and has softer convulsions. The seizure, however, is still severe and fractures occur. Preliminary curarization will prevent trauma in electro-shock therapy. Shots include: patients receiving curare, quinine methochloride, metrazol, and electro-shock; patients having strong and soft seizures; reactions to the therapies being pointed out; a nurse mixing methoquinine and metrazol; the electro-shock apparatus; and an X-ray of a patient injured during a strong seizure. Shot in Omaha, Nebraska.
Copyright:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain. (More information)
Extent:
017 min.
Color:
Color
Sound:
Silent
Credits:
Services of A.E. Bennett and P.T. Cash.
Provenance:
Received: Oct. 3, 1985 as a donation from the Univ. of Pittsburgh, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinical Library.
Technique:
Live action
NLM Unique ID:
8800321A (See catalog record)
OCLC no.:
31660379