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Identifying patient harm from direct oral anticoagulants

Series Title(s):
Pennsylvania patient safety advisory
Author(s):
Valentine, David, author
Gaunt, Michael J., author
Grissinger, Matthew, author
Contributor(s):
Pennsylvania. Patient Safety Authority, issuing body.
Publication:
[Harrisburg, Pa.] : Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, June 2018
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Administration, Oral
Anticoagulants -- administration & dosage
Anticoagulants -- adverse effects
Medication Errors -- statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antithrombins -- administration & dosage
Antithrombins -- adverse effects
Dabigatran -- administration & dosage
Dabigatran -- adverse effects
Forecasting
Hemorrhage -- chemically induced
Medication Errors -- prevention & control
Medication Errors -- trends
Middle Aged
Patient Safety
Rivaroxaban -- administration & dosage
Rivaroxaban -- adverse effects
Humans
Pennsylvania
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), a newer class of oral anticoagulants, have been promoted as a safer and more effective option than warfarin. A query of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PSRS) database for events involving DOACs that occurred from January 2011 through August 2017 revealed 1,811 reported events, including 265 that resulted in patient harm. The data from these reports were categorized into two groups: harmful events (i.e., adverse drug events) (14.6%, n = 265) and medication errors without harm (85.4%, n = 1,546). Hemorrhage was the most frequently reported adverse event (70.2%, n = 186 of 265). Almost 40% (38.5%, n = 102 of 265) of harmful events occurred to patients who were 80 years or older. Duplicate therapy (33.3%, n = 515 of 1,546) was the most frequently reported type of error without harm. Employing standard protocols to guide therapy, reviewing baseline patient information, including patient weight (in metric units) and laboratory test results such as renal and liver function, and considering the therapeutic indication can aid selection of an appropriate anticoagulant medication for patients.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY-NC-DC license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (17 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101735820 (See catalog record)
Series Title(s):
Pennsylvania patient safety advisory
Author(s):
Valentine, David, author
Gaunt, Michael J., author
Grissinger, Matthew, author
Contributor(s):
Pennsylvania. Patient Safety Authority, issuing body.
Publication:
[Harrisburg, Pa.] : Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, June 2018
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Administration, Oral
Anticoagulants -- administration & dosage
Anticoagulants -- adverse effects
Medication Errors -- statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antithrombins -- administration & dosage
Antithrombins -- adverse effects
Dabigatran -- administration & dosage
Dabigatran -- adverse effects
Forecasting
Hemorrhage -- chemically induced
Medication Errors -- prevention & control
Medication Errors -- trends
Middle Aged
Patient Safety
Rivaroxaban -- administration & dosage
Rivaroxaban -- adverse effects
Humans
Pennsylvania
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), a newer class of oral anticoagulants, have been promoted as a safer and more effective option than warfarin. A query of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System (PA-PSRS) database for events involving DOACs that occurred from January 2011 through August 2017 revealed 1,811 reported events, including 265 that resulted in patient harm. The data from these reports were categorized into two groups: harmful events (i.e., adverse drug events) (14.6%, n = 265) and medication errors without harm (85.4%, n = 1,546). Hemorrhage was the most frequently reported adverse event (70.2%, n = 186 of 265). Almost 40% (38.5%, n = 102 of 265) of harmful events occurred to patients who were 80 years or older. Duplicate therapy (33.3%, n = 515 of 1,546) was the most frequently reported type of error without harm. Employing standard protocols to guide therapy, reviewing baseline patient information, including patient weight (in metric units) and laboratory test results such as renal and liver function, and considering the therapeutic indication can aid selection of an appropriate anticoagulant medication for patients.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY-NC-DC license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (17 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101735820 (See catalog record)