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Creating better systems of care for adults with disabilities: lessons for policy and practice

Series Title(s):
Case study (Commonwealth fund)
Author(s):
Hostetter, Martha, author
Klein, Sarah, author
Contributor(s):
Commonwealth Fund, issuing body.
Publication:
[New York, N.Y.] : Commonwealth Fund, September 2018
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Disabled Persons -- rehabilitation
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services for Persons with Disabilities
Health Services Needs and Demand
Intellectual Disability -- rehabilitation
Intellectual Disability -- therapy
Mental Disorders -- rehabilitation
Mental Disorders -- therapy
Social Support
Employment
Healthcare Disparities
Long-Term Care
Managed Care Programs
Medicaid
Humans
Florida
Minnesota
New York City
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
KEY FEATURES. Some health plans and clinics have created customized approaches for people with disabilities. These programs share key features including ensuring accessible care, proactively identifying and treating secondary conditions, engaging and building trust with patients, and integrating long-term services and supports to improve health and promote independence and social inclusion. TARGET POPULATIONS. Working-age adults living with physical disabilities, intellectual and developmental disabilities, or serious mental illnesses. WHY IT'S IMPORTANT. Americans with disabilities often have difficulty finding physically accessible practices or providers with expertise in their conditions. Compared with other adults, they receive less preventive care and have a high incidence of potentially preventable medical conditions stemming from their disabilities. BENEFITS. Engaging patients in managing their conditions and offering them a variety of support services can help avoid medical complications and improve quality of life. CHALLENGES. Ensuring adequate funding. Programs that serve adults with disabilities often rely on private and public grants to cover their costs. More closely managing medical and long-term services and supports for people with disabilities--as a growing number of states are doing through managed care--may lead to higher rather than lower spending, at least in the short term.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (25 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
Portraits
NLM Unique ID:
101734874 (See catalog record)
Series Title(s):
Case study (Commonwealth fund)
Author(s):
Hostetter, Martha, author
Klein, Sarah, author
Contributor(s):
Commonwealth Fund, issuing body.
Publication:
[New York, N.Y.] : Commonwealth Fund, September 2018
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Disabled Persons -- rehabilitation
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services for Persons with Disabilities
Health Services Needs and Demand
Intellectual Disability -- rehabilitation
Intellectual Disability -- therapy
Mental Disorders -- rehabilitation
Mental Disorders -- therapy
Social Support
Employment
Healthcare Disparities
Long-Term Care
Managed Care Programs
Medicaid
Humans
Florida
Minnesota
New York City
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
KEY FEATURES. Some health plans and clinics have created customized approaches for people with disabilities. These programs share key features including ensuring accessible care, proactively identifying and treating secondary conditions, engaging and building trust with patients, and integrating long-term services and supports to improve health and promote independence and social inclusion. TARGET POPULATIONS. Working-age adults living with physical disabilities, intellectual and developmental disabilities, or serious mental illnesses. WHY IT'S IMPORTANT. Americans with disabilities often have difficulty finding physically accessible practices or providers with expertise in their conditions. Compared with other adults, they receive less preventive care and have a high incidence of potentially preventable medical conditions stemming from their disabilities. BENEFITS. Engaging patients in managing their conditions and offering them a variety of support services can help avoid medical complications and improve quality of life. CHALLENGES. Ensuring adequate funding. Programs that serve adults with disabilities often rely on private and public grants to cover their costs. More closely managing medical and long-term services and supports for people with disabilities--as a growing number of states are doing through managed care--may lead to higher rather than lower spending, at least in the short term.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (25 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
Portraits
NLM Unique ID:
101734874 (See catalog record)