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How would state-based individual mandates affect health insurance coverage and premium costs?

Series Title(s):
Report (Commonwealth Fund)
Author(s):
Blumberg, Linda J., author
Buettgens, Matthew, author
Holahan, John, author
Contributor(s):
Commonwealth Fund, issuing body.
Urban Institute, issuing body.
Publication:
[New York, N.Y.] : Commonwealth Fund, July 2018
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Insurance Exchanges -- economics
Health Insurance Exchanges -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage -- economics
Insurance Coverage -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health -- economics
Insurance, Health -- statistics & numerical data
Mandatory Programs -- economics
Medically Uninsured -- statistics & numerical data
State Government
Forecasting
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage -- trends
Insurance, Health -- trends
Medicaid -- statistics & numerical data
Models, Theoretical
Taxes
Uncompensated Care -- statistics & numerical data
Humans
United States
United States.
State Children's Health Insurance Program (U.S.)
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
ISSUE. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 eliminated the financial penalty of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate. States could reinstate a similar penalty to encourage health insurance enrollment, ensuring broad sharing of health care costs across healthy and sick populations to stabilize the marketplaces. GOAL. To provide state-by-state estimates of the impact on insurance coverage, premiums, and mandate penalty revenues if the state were to adopt an individual mandate. METHODS. Urban Institute's Health Insurance Policy Simulation Model (HIPSM) is used to estimate the coverage and cost impacts of state-specific individual mandates. We assume each state adopts an individual mandate similar to the ACA's. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION. If all states implemented individual mandates, the number of uninsured would be lower by 3.9 million in 2019 and 7.5 million in 2022. On average, marketplace premiums would be 11.8 percent lower in 2019. State mandate penalty revenues would amount to $7.4 billion and demand for uncompensated care would be $11.4 billion lower. The impact on coverage and on premiums varies in significant ways across states. For example, in 2019, the number of people uninsured would be 19 percent lower in Colorado and 10 percent lower in California if they implemented their own mandates. With mandates in place, average premiums would be 4 percent lower in Alaska and 15 percent lower in Washington.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (18 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101734832 (See catalog record)
Series Title(s):
Report (Commonwealth Fund)
Author(s):
Blumberg, Linda J., author
Buettgens, Matthew, author
Holahan, John, author
Contributor(s):
Commonwealth Fund, issuing body.
Urban Institute, issuing body.
Publication:
[New York, N.Y.] : Commonwealth Fund, July 2018
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Insurance Exchanges -- economics
Health Insurance Exchanges -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage -- economics
Insurance Coverage -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health -- economics
Insurance, Health -- statistics & numerical data
Mandatory Programs -- economics
Medically Uninsured -- statistics & numerical data
State Government
Forecasting
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage -- trends
Insurance, Health -- trends
Medicaid -- statistics & numerical data
Models, Theoretical
Taxes
Uncompensated Care -- statistics & numerical data
Humans
United States
United States.
State Children's Health Insurance Program (U.S.)
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
ISSUE. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 eliminated the financial penalty of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate. States could reinstate a similar penalty to encourage health insurance enrollment, ensuring broad sharing of health care costs across healthy and sick populations to stabilize the marketplaces. GOAL. To provide state-by-state estimates of the impact on insurance coverage, premiums, and mandate penalty revenues if the state were to adopt an individual mandate. METHODS. Urban Institute's Health Insurance Policy Simulation Model (HIPSM) is used to estimate the coverage and cost impacts of state-specific individual mandates. We assume each state adopts an individual mandate similar to the ACA's. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION. If all states implemented individual mandates, the number of uninsured would be lower by 3.9 million in 2019 and 7.5 million in 2022. On average, marketplace premiums would be 11.8 percent lower in 2019. State mandate penalty revenues would amount to $7.4 billion and demand for uncompensated care would be $11.4 billion lower. The impact on coverage and on premiums varies in significant ways across states. For example, in 2019, the number of people uninsured would be 19 percent lower in Colorado and 10 percent lower in California if they implemented their own mandates. With mandates in place, average premiums would be 4 percent lower in Alaska and 15 percent lower in Washington.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (18 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101734832 (See catalog record)