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What we know about health reform in Massachusetts

Series Title(s):
Issue in brief (Center for Retirement Research)
Author(s):
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey T., author
Contributor(s):
Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, issuing body.
Publication:
Chestnut Hill, MA : Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, May 2014
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Care Reform -- organization & administration
Insurance Coverage -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health -- statistics & numerical data
Employment -- statistics & numerical data
Employment -- trends
Forecasting
Health Benefit Plans, Employee
Health Services Accessibility -- statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility -- trends
Health Status
Insurance Coverage -- trends
Insurance, Health -- trends
Medically Uninsured -- statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Humans
Massachusetts
United States
United States.
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
In 2006, Massachusetts passed comprehensive health reform. Given inherent interest in the reform and its similarity to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), numerous studies have documented its effect on a variety of outcomes, from insurance coverage to employment. The sheer number of these studies can make it difficult to keep track of what is known--and what is not. Moreover, little research has focused on the employment outcomes of 55-64 year olds, a group that increasingly needs to work longer. Thus, this brief summarizes the literature on the Massachusetts Reform before examining how labor market outcomes have changed for 55-64 year olds. The discussion is organized as follows. The first section describes the Massachusetts Reform and its relationship to the ACA. The second section summarizes research on the Reform with an eye on: (1) insurance coverage; (2) the provision of health services; (3) health outcomes; and (4) labor market effects. The third section uses Current Population Survey data to examine any changes in the labor supply and employment of 55-64 year olds. The final section concludes that the Massachusetts Reform seems to have achieved many of its goals without triggering higher unemployment and without "crowding-out" employer-sponsored insurance. A couple of issues of concern remain, including costs and a slight decline in labor force participation among 55-64 year olds. However, to the extent that the Massachusetts Reform is being used as a "crystal ball" for the ACA, this brief suggests the message is largely positive.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (8 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101710003 (See catalog record)
Series Title(s):
Issue in brief (Center for Retirement Research)
Author(s):
Sanzenbacher, Geoffrey T., author
Contributor(s):
Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, issuing body.
Publication:
Chestnut Hill, MA : Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, May 2014
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Care Reform -- organization & administration
Insurance Coverage -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health -- statistics & numerical data
Employment -- statistics & numerical data
Employment -- trends
Forecasting
Health Benefit Plans, Employee
Health Services Accessibility -- statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility -- trends
Health Status
Insurance Coverage -- trends
Insurance, Health -- trends
Medically Uninsured -- statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Humans
Massachusetts
United States
United States.
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
In 2006, Massachusetts passed comprehensive health reform. Given inherent interest in the reform and its similarity to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), numerous studies have documented its effect on a variety of outcomes, from insurance coverage to employment. The sheer number of these studies can make it difficult to keep track of what is known--and what is not. Moreover, little research has focused on the employment outcomes of 55-64 year olds, a group that increasingly needs to work longer. Thus, this brief summarizes the literature on the Massachusetts Reform before examining how labor market outcomes have changed for 55-64 year olds. The discussion is organized as follows. The first section describes the Massachusetts Reform and its relationship to the ACA. The second section summarizes research on the Reform with an eye on: (1) insurance coverage; (2) the provision of health services; (3) health outcomes; and (4) labor market effects. The third section uses Current Population Survey data to examine any changes in the labor supply and employment of 55-64 year olds. The final section concludes that the Massachusetts Reform seems to have achieved many of its goals without triggering higher unemployment and without "crowding-out" employer-sponsored insurance. A couple of issues of concern remain, including costs and a slight decline in labor force participation among 55-64 year olds. However, to the extent that the Massachusetts Reform is being used as a "crystal ball" for the ACA, this brief suggests the message is largely positive.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (8 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101710003 (See catalog record)