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Ten ways that the House American Health Care Act could affect women

Series Title(s):
Issue brief (Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation)
Author(s):
Ranji, Usha, author
Salganicoff, Alina, author
Sobel, Laurie, author
Rosenzweig, Caroline, author
Contributor(s):
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, issuing body.
Publication:
Menlo Park, CA : Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, May 2017
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Care Reform -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility
Insurance Coverage
Medicaid
Women's Health
Women's Health Services
Abortion, Legal
Capitation Fee
Contraception
Insurance Benefits
International Planned Parenthood Federation
Prenatal Care
Preventive Health Services
Reproductive Health Services
Humans
United States
United States.
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
Women have much at stake as the nation debates the future of coverage in the United States. Because the Affordable Care Act (ACA) made fundamental changes to women's health coverage and benefits, changes to the law and the regulations that stem from it would have a direct impact on millions of women with private insurance and Medicaid. On May 4, 2017, the House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act (AHCA), to repeal and replace elements of the ACA (Appendix Table 1). It would eliminate individual and employer insurance mandates, effectively end the ACA Medicaid expansion, cap federal funds for the Medicaid program, make major changes to the federal tax subsidies available to assist individuals who purchase private insurance, and ban federal Medicaid funds from going to Planned Parenthood. It would also allow states to waive the ACA's Essential Health Benefits requirements and permit health status as a factor in insurance rating for individuals who do not maintain continuous coverage with the goal of reducing insurance costs. The Senate will now take up legislation to repeal and replace the ACA and may consider several elements that the House has approved in the AHCA. This brief reviews the implications of the AHCA for women's access to care and coverage.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (14 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101707766 (See catalog record)
Series Title(s):
Issue brief (Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation)
Author(s):
Ranji, Usha, author
Salganicoff, Alina, author
Sobel, Laurie, author
Rosenzweig, Caroline, author
Contributor(s):
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, issuing body.
Publication:
Menlo Park, CA : Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, May 2017
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Care Reform -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility
Insurance Coverage
Medicaid
Women's Health
Women's Health Services
Abortion, Legal
Capitation Fee
Contraception
Insurance Benefits
International Planned Parenthood Federation
Prenatal Care
Preventive Health Services
Reproductive Health Services
Humans
United States
United States.
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
Women have much at stake as the nation debates the future of coverage in the United States. Because the Affordable Care Act (ACA) made fundamental changes to women's health coverage and benefits, changes to the law and the regulations that stem from it would have a direct impact on millions of women with private insurance and Medicaid. On May 4, 2017, the House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act (AHCA), to repeal and replace elements of the ACA (Appendix Table 1). It would eliminate individual and employer insurance mandates, effectively end the ACA Medicaid expansion, cap federal funds for the Medicaid program, make major changes to the federal tax subsidies available to assist individuals who purchase private insurance, and ban federal Medicaid funds from going to Planned Parenthood. It would also allow states to waive the ACA's Essential Health Benefits requirements and permit health status as a factor in insurance rating for individuals who do not maintain continuous coverage with the goal of reducing insurance costs. The Senate will now take up legislation to repeal and replace the ACA and may consider several elements that the House has approved in the AHCA. This brief reviews the implications of the AHCA for women's access to care and coverage.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (14 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101707766 (See catalog record)