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Mirror, mirror on the wall: how the performance of the U.S. health care system compares internationally : 2014 update

Author(s):
Davis, Karen, author
Stremikis, Kristof, author
Squires, David, author
Schoen, Cathy, author
Contributor(s):
Commonwealth Fund, issuing body.
Publication:
New York, NY : Commonwealth Fund, 2014
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Delivery of Health Care -- economics
Delivery of Health Care -- legislation & jurisprudence
Delivery of Health Care -- statistics & numerical data
Efficiency
Forecasting
Global Health
Health Care Costs -- statistics & numerical data
Health Care Reform -- economics
Health Care Reform -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Care Reform -- statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility -- economics
Health Services Accessibility -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility -- statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities -- statistics & numerical data
Medical Informatics -- trends
Patient-Centered Care -- statistics & numerical data
Preventive Health Services -- economics
Preventive Health Services -- legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Australia
Canada
Europe
New Zealand
United States
United States.
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
The United States health care system is the most expensive in the world, but comparative analyses consistently show the U.S. underperforms relative to other countries on most dimensions of performance. Among the 11 nations studied in this report--Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States--the U.S. ranks last, as it did in prior editions of Mirror, Mirror. The United Kingdom ranks first, followed closely by Switzerland. Since the data in this study were collected, the U.S. has made significant strides adopting health information technology and undertaking payment and delivery system reforms spurred by the Affordable Care Act. Continued implementation of the law could further encourage more affordable access and more efficient organization and delivery of health care, and allow investment in preventive and population health measures that could improve the performance of the U.S. health care system.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (31 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101635001 (See catalog record)
Author(s):
Davis, Karen, author
Stremikis, Kristof, author
Squires, David, author
Schoen, Cathy, author
Contributor(s):
Commonwealth Fund, issuing body.
Publication:
New York, NY : Commonwealth Fund, 2014
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Delivery of Health Care -- economics
Delivery of Health Care -- legislation & jurisprudence
Delivery of Health Care -- statistics & numerical data
Efficiency
Forecasting
Global Health
Health Care Costs -- statistics & numerical data
Health Care Reform -- economics
Health Care Reform -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Care Reform -- statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility -- economics
Health Services Accessibility -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility -- statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities -- statistics & numerical data
Medical Informatics -- trends
Patient-Centered Care -- statistics & numerical data
Preventive Health Services -- economics
Preventive Health Services -- legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Australia
Canada
Europe
New Zealand
United States
United States.
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
The United States health care system is the most expensive in the world, but comparative analyses consistently show the U.S. underperforms relative to other countries on most dimensions of performance. Among the 11 nations studied in this report--Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States--the U.S. ranks last, as it did in prior editions of Mirror, Mirror. The United Kingdom ranks first, followed closely by Switzerland. Since the data in this study were collected, the U.S. has made significant strides adopting health information technology and undertaking payment and delivery system reforms spurred by the Affordable Care Act. Continued implementation of the law could further encourage more affordable access and more efficient organization and delivery of health care, and allow investment in preventive and population health measures that could improve the performance of the U.S. health care system.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
1 online resource (1 PDF file (31 pages))
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101635001 (See catalog record)