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Emphysema

Uniform Title(s):
Emphysema (University of Washington. School of Medicine)
Contributor(s):
Francis, Byron F., consultant
Martin, C. J., 1917-, screenwriter
University of Washington. Department of Health Sciences Illustration, production company.
University of Washington. School of Medicine, donor.
Publication:
[Seattle, WA] : The University of Washington, School of Medicine, [1959]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
Subject(s):
Pulmonary Emphysema
Aged
Genre(s):
Case Reports
Documentaries and Factual Films
Abstract:
This film begins by introducing a man named Mr. Mack. The camera follows Mr. Mack, a patient with severe emphysema, as he struggles to walk up the stairs to his doctor's office due to shortness of breath. The narrator gives a very bleak description of Mr. Mack, explaining that he has experienced many different respiratory diseases in his lifetime which have made him feel useless and embarrassed. He cannot do most simple everyday tasks, and therefore suffers depression. The film then shows a simple diagram of the lungs that illustrates the actual physical effect of emphysema on the lungs. The narrator mentions that Mr. Mack should stop smoking, and that while researchers are still unsure of the cause of emphysema, they believe that air pollution and smoking are two key contributors to the disease. Although Mr. Mack takes medicine, these drugs can only reduce the pain, not eliminate it. According to the narrator, had Mr. Mack gone to get treatment in its early stages, he likely would not be in such a crippling condition. The film then showed several charts and graphs showing emphysema death rates and its prevalence compared to other common diseases. The film concludes by stating that although emphysema is a bigger problem than tuberculosis, it lacks public recognition, and that the solutions to this problem are an educated public, more research and investigation, and a greater emphasis on screening.
Rights:
This item may be under copyright protection. Please ask copyright owner for permission before publishing.
Copyright Holder:
University of Washington, School of Medicine; Source: Item; Research date: 12/23/2013
Extent:
016 min.
Color:
Color
Sound:
Sound
Credits:
Script, C.J. Martin, M.D. ; direction, Ralph E. Pearson ; sound, David C. Botting ; drawings, Stephen G. Gilbert, Virginia E. Brooks ; photography, Clifford L. Freehe ; narration, Reg Miller.
Provenance:
Unknown, in NLM collection before 2000.
Technique:
Live action
NLM Unique ID:
101622456 (See catalog record)
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Uniform Title(s):
Emphysema (University of Washington. School of Medicine)
Contributor(s):
Francis, Byron F., consultant
Martin, C. J., 1917-, screenwriter
University of Washington. Department of Health Sciences Illustration, production company.
University of Washington. School of Medicine, donor.
Publication:
[Seattle, WA] : The University of Washington, School of Medicine, [1959]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
Subject(s):
Pulmonary Emphysema
Aged
Genre(s):
Case Reports
Documentaries and Factual Films
Abstract:
This film begins by introducing a man named Mr. Mack. The camera follows Mr. Mack, a patient with severe emphysema, as he struggles to walk up the stairs to his doctor's office due to shortness of breath. The narrator gives a very bleak description of Mr. Mack, explaining that he has experienced many different respiratory diseases in his lifetime which have made him feel useless and embarrassed. He cannot do most simple everyday tasks, and therefore suffers depression. The film then shows a simple diagram of the lungs that illustrates the actual physical effect of emphysema on the lungs. The narrator mentions that Mr. Mack should stop smoking, and that while researchers are still unsure of the cause of emphysema, they believe that air pollution and smoking are two key contributors to the disease. Although Mr. Mack takes medicine, these drugs can only reduce the pain, not eliminate it. According to the narrator, had Mr. Mack gone to get treatment in its early stages, he likely would not be in such a crippling condition. The film then showed several charts and graphs showing emphysema death rates and its prevalence compared to other common diseases. The film concludes by stating that although emphysema is a bigger problem than tuberculosis, it lacks public recognition, and that the solutions to this problem are an educated public, more research and investigation, and a greater emphasis on screening.
Rights:
This item may be under copyright protection. Please ask copyright owner for permission before publishing.
Copyright Holder:
University of Washington, School of Medicine; Source: Item; Research date: 12/23/2013
Extent:
016 min.
Color:
Color
Sound:
Sound
Credits:
Script, C.J. Martin, M.D. ; direction, Ralph E. Pearson ; sound, David C. Botting ; drawings, Stephen G. Gilbert, Virginia E. Brooks ; photography, Clifford L. Freehe ; narration, Reg Miller.
Provenance:
Unknown, in NLM collection before 2000.
Technique:
Live action
NLM Unique ID:
101622456 (See catalog record)