Skip Navigation

Retail clinics: six state approaches to regulation and licensing

Contributor(s):
Takach, Mary.
Witgert, Kathy.
California HealthCare Foundation.
Publication:
[Oakland, Calif.] : California HealthCare Foundation, [2009]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Ambulatory Care Facilities -- organization & administration
Commerce -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility -- organization & administration
Advertising as Topic -- legislation & jurisprudence
Ambulatory Care Facilities -- economics
Ambulatory Care Facilities -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility -- trends
Licensure
Marketing -- legislation & jurisprudence
Medicaid
Nurse Practitioners
Physician Assistants
Primary Health Care
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Referral and Consultation
State Government
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
This issue brief explores how six states--California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Texas--are using regulation and licensure to promote, structure, or limit the operation of retail clinics. These six states were selected because their recent experiences may provide instructive lessons for other states. The states' approaches to the clinics vary, as do interpretations of how existing regulations fit the retail clinic model. Only one state, Massachusetts, has written new regulations expressly for retail clinics. Among the steps being taken or considered by these states are: (1) Creating a separate regulatory category for retail clinics; (2) Licensing retail clinics as they do other health care facilities; (3) Altering oversight requirements regarding nurse practitioners and physician assistants; (4) Imposing or loosening marketing and advertising restrictions; (5) Developing Medicaid policies to facilitate clinic participation; and (6) Requiring clinics to make referrals to primary care providers. The project's researchers conducted interviews with stakeholders in each of the six states concerning the state's regulation of health services in retail settings. The researchers interviewed representatives of state Medicaid and licensing and certification agencies; retail clinics; organizations that represent health care providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners, and two state primary care associations; and state legislators and/or their staff. Interview protocols were tailored for each stakeholder group. This report addresses some common themes that emerged, as well as each state's unique response to the emergence of retail clinics.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101518180 (See catalog record)
Contributor(s):
Takach, Mary.
Witgert, Kathy.
California HealthCare Foundation.
Publication:
[Oakland, Calif.] : California HealthCare Foundation, [2009]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Ambulatory Care Facilities -- organization & administration
Commerce -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility -- organization & administration
Advertising as Topic -- legislation & jurisprudence
Ambulatory Care Facilities -- economics
Ambulatory Care Facilities -- legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility -- trends
Licensure
Marketing -- legislation & jurisprudence
Medicaid
Nurse Practitioners
Physician Assistants
Primary Health Care
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Referral and Consultation
State Government
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
This issue brief explores how six states--California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Texas--are using regulation and licensure to promote, structure, or limit the operation of retail clinics. These six states were selected because their recent experiences may provide instructive lessons for other states. The states' approaches to the clinics vary, as do interpretations of how existing regulations fit the retail clinic model. Only one state, Massachusetts, has written new regulations expressly for retail clinics. Among the steps being taken or considered by these states are: (1) Creating a separate regulatory category for retail clinics; (2) Licensing retail clinics as they do other health care facilities; (3) Altering oversight requirements regarding nurse practitioners and physician assistants; (4) Imposing or loosening marketing and advertising restrictions; (5) Developing Medicaid policies to facilitate clinic participation; and (6) Requiring clinics to make referrals to primary care providers. The project's researchers conducted interviews with stakeholders in each of the six states concerning the state's regulation of health services in retail settings. The researchers interviewed representatives of state Medicaid and licensing and certification agencies; retail clinics; organizations that represent health care providers, including physicians, nurse practitioners, and two state primary care associations; and state legislators and/or their staff. Interview protocols were tailored for each stakeholder group. This report addresses some common themes that emerged, as well as each state's unique response to the emergence of retail clinics.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101518180 (See catalog record)