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Squeezed: how costs for insuring families are outpacing income : a state-by-state analysis

Contributor(s):
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
State Health Access Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota.
Publication:
[Minneapolis, Minn.] : State Health Access Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota, [2008]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Costs and Cost Analysis -- statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- economics
Insurance Coverage -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health -- statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Family
Forecasting
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- statistics & numerical data
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- trends
Health Surveys
Income
Medically Uninsured -- statistics & numerical data
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
This article reveals how the cost of family health insurance nationwide is increasing dramatically for employees without anywhere near an equivalent increase in family income. If this trend continues, more workers are likely to become uninsured because of the expense. As part of Cover the Uninsured Week (April 27-May 3), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation commissioned the University of Minnesota to prepare this comprehensive state-by-state analysis on the cost of family health insurance premiums as compared to income. The researchers used data from ongoing federal surveys of individuals and employers to examine trends in employer-sponsored health insurance coverage, premiums and offer rates across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. They collected additional data on offer rates from the federal Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component. Key Findings: (1) The amount workers pay for family coverage nationwide has increased by 30 percent from $8,281 in 2001 to $10,728 in 2005. (2) Employee income has increased by only 3 percent in the same time period. (3) The average cost employers pay for their share of family coverage has increased by 28 percent from $6,360 to $8,143.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY-NC-DC license. (More information)
Extent:
10 leaves.
NLM Unique ID:
101473204 (See catalog record)
Contributor(s):
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
State Health Access Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota.
Publication:
[Minneapolis, Minn.] : State Health Access Data Assistance Center, University of Minnesota, [2008]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Costs and Cost Analysis -- statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- economics
Insurance Coverage -- statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health -- statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Family
Forecasting
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- statistics & numerical data
Health Benefit Plans, Employee -- trends
Health Surveys
Income
Medically Uninsured -- statistics & numerical data
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
This article reveals how the cost of family health insurance nationwide is increasing dramatically for employees without anywhere near an equivalent increase in family income. If this trend continues, more workers are likely to become uninsured because of the expense. As part of Cover the Uninsured Week (April 27-May 3), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation commissioned the University of Minnesota to prepare this comprehensive state-by-state analysis on the cost of family health insurance premiums as compared to income. The researchers used data from ongoing federal surveys of individuals and employers to examine trends in employer-sponsored health insurance coverage, premiums and offer rates across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. They collected additional data on offer rates from the federal Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component. Key Findings: (1) The amount workers pay for family coverage nationwide has increased by 30 percent from $8,281 in 2001 to $10,728 in 2005. (2) Employee income has increased by only 3 percent in the same time period. (3) The average cost employers pay for their share of family coverage has increased by 28 percent from $6,360 to $8,143.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY-NC-DC license. (More information)
Extent:
10 leaves.
NLM Unique ID:
101473204 (See catalog record)