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Culture change in a for-profit nursing home chain: an evaluation

Contributor(s):
Grant, Leslie A.
Commonwealth Fund.
Publication:
[New York, N.Y.] : Commonwealth Fund, [2008]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Facilities, Proprietary
Nursing Homes
Organizational Culture
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Patient-Centered Care
Quality of Health Care
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Evaluation Studies
Technical Report
Abstract:
Beverly Healthcare--one of the nation's largest nursing home chains--launched a culture change initiative in 2002, called resident-centered care (RCC). This report presents findings from a 12-month evaluation of that initiative. While most prior culture change models had been implemented by nonprofit organizations in a small number of facilities, this project marked a major departure for the culture change movement because it was the first time that a large national for-profit chain implemented culture change. The RCC initiative was successful in that it introduced new organizational practices, made improvements in resident quality of life (e.g., in choice and autonomy), and created better work environments for staff. The RCC initiative did not achieve short-term financial gains. The business case for culture change, however, should be based on long-term goals to reposition the nursing home within an evolving continuum of care.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101468972 (See catalog record)
Contributor(s):
Grant, Leslie A.
Commonwealth Fund.
Publication:
[New York, N.Y.] : Commonwealth Fund, [2008]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Health Facilities, Proprietary
Nursing Homes
Organizational Culture
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Patient-Centered Care
Quality of Health Care
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Evaluation Studies
Technical Report
Abstract:
Beverly Healthcare--one of the nation's largest nursing home chains--launched a culture change initiative in 2002, called resident-centered care (RCC). This report presents findings from a 12-month evaluation of that initiative. While most prior culture change models had been implemented by nonprofit organizations in a small number of facilities, this project marked a major departure for the culture change movement because it was the first time that a large national for-profit chain implemented culture change. The RCC initiative was successful in that it introduced new organizational practices, made improvements in resident quality of life (e.g., in choice and autonomy), and created better work environments for staff. The RCC initiative did not achieve short-term financial gains. The business case for culture change, however, should be based on long-term goals to reposition the nursing home within an evolving continuum of care.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101468972 (See catalog record)