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Becoming oldest-old: evidence from historical U.S. data

Series Title(s):
Center for Retirement Research working paper
Contributor(s):
Costa, Dora L.
Lahey, Joanna.
Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.
Publication:
Chestnut Hill, MA : Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, c2003
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Aging
Survival Analysis
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection
Forecasting
Life Expectancy -- trends
Mortality
Statistics
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
We use historical data to show that such indicators of insults in early childhood and young adulthood as quarter of birth, residence, occupation, wealth, and the incidence of specific infectious diseases affected older age mortality. We find that the effect of quarter of birth on older age mortality has diminished over the twentieth century, implying improvements in early life environmental factors. We find that up to one-fifth of the increase between 1900 and 1999 in the probability of a 65 year old surviving to age 85 may be attributable to early life conditions.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
42 p.
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101468781 (See catalog record)
Series Title(s):
Center for Retirement Research working paper
Contributor(s):
Costa, Dora L.
Lahey, Joanna.
Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.
Publication:
Chestnut Hill, MA : Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, c2003
Language(s):
English
Format:
Text
Subject(s):
Aging
Survival Analysis
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection
Forecasting
Life Expectancy -- trends
Mortality
Statistics
Humans
United States
Genre(s):
Technical Report
Abstract:
We use historical data to show that such indicators of insults in early childhood and young adulthood as quarter of birth, residence, occupation, wealth, and the incidence of specific infectious diseases affected older age mortality. We find that the effect of quarter of birth on older age mortality has diminished over the twentieth century, implying improvements in early life environmental factors. We find that up to one-fifth of the increase between 1900 and 1999 in the probability of a 65 year old surviving to age 85 may be attributable to early life conditions.
Copyright:
Reproduced with permission of the copyright holder. Further use of the material is subject to CC BY license. (More information)
Extent:
42 p.
Illustrations:
Illustrations
NLM Unique ID:
101468781 (See catalog record)