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The hand that feels the patient's pulse transmits many messages that help to clarify the diagnosis

Contributor(s):
Almasy, Paul, photographer
Language(s):
English
French
Format:
Still image
Subject(s):
Pulse
World Health Organization
Abstract:
The hands of Professor Clarence Crafoord of Stockholm, a pioneer of modern heart surgery, are shown taking the pulse of a patient (of whom only a hand is shown). Verso:WHO/11922. General-Cardiovascular Diseases. The heart , a symbol of life. Statistics show that cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in adults today, and their incidence seems to be on the increase. WHO has launched a number of projects in several countries ti obtain more knowledge about the factors which affect the heart and blood vessels. In a special issue World Health illustrates aspects of the research that is going on in this field. The innumerable bits and pieces of equipment that surround the docotor today have not superseded his need for personal experience and clinical flair. The hand that feels the patient's pulse transmits many messages that help to clarify the diagnosis: texture of the skin, its moisture, the "feel" of the pulse, its beat, regularity and strength, and other signs. The hands are those of Professor Clarence Crafoord of Stockhol, a pioneer of modern heart surgery.
Copyright:
WHO must be mentioned in accompanying text and/of given credit. This item may be under copyright protection. Please ask copyright owner for permission before publishing.
Copyright Holder:
World Health Organization; Source: Record; Research date: 20151027
Extent:
1 photoprint.
NLM Unique ID:
101436949 (See catalog record)
NLM Image ID:
A013949
Contributor(s):
Almasy, Paul, photographer
Language(s):
English
French
Format:
Still image
Subject(s):
Pulse
World Health Organization
Abstract:
The hands of Professor Clarence Crafoord of Stockholm, a pioneer of modern heart surgery, are shown taking the pulse of a patient (of whom only a hand is shown). Verso:WHO/11922. General-Cardiovascular Diseases. The heart , a symbol of life. Statistics show that cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in adults today, and their incidence seems to be on the increase. WHO has launched a number of projects in several countries ti obtain more knowledge about the factors which affect the heart and blood vessels. In a special issue World Health illustrates aspects of the research that is going on in this field. The innumerable bits and pieces of equipment that surround the docotor today have not superseded his need for personal experience and clinical flair. The hand that feels the patient's pulse transmits many messages that help to clarify the diagnosis: texture of the skin, its moisture, the "feel" of the pulse, its beat, regularity and strength, and other signs. The hands are those of Professor Clarence Crafoord of Stockhol, a pioneer of modern heart surgery.
Copyright:
WHO must be mentioned in accompanying text and/of given credit. This item may be under copyright protection. Please ask copyright owner for permission before publishing.
Copyright Holder:
World Health Organization; Source: Record; Research date: 20151027
Extent:
1 photoprint.
NLM Unique ID:
101436949 (See catalog record)
NLM Image ID:
A013949