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Lectures on the theory and practice of midwifery

Contributor(s):
MacKenzie, Colin, 1697 or 1698-1775
Publication:
Produced: [ca. 1775?]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Manuscript text
Subject(s):
Cesarean Section
Gynecology -- education
Obstetrics -- education
Midwifery -- education
Smellie, William, 1697-1763.
Genre(s):
Lecture Notes
Abstract:
Mackenzie's lectures occupy two-thirds of the volume and consists of 22 lectures. Topics include the progress of midwifery, organs of generation, gravid uterus, pregnancy disorders, conception, natual labor, use of instruments, general rules for forceps, cases, preternatural labor, twins, narrow pelvis and puerperal fever. Discussion of the forceps and mechanisms of labor refer to William Smellie, noted physician of gynecology.
Copyright:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain. (More information)
Extent:
61 leaves
NLM Unique ID:
100954829 (See catalog record)
Biograhical Sketch:
Mackenzie was a student of William Smellie and was a consultant in the first cesarean operations in England. He also was involved in the disputed discovery of the circulatory relationship between the placenta and uterus. He brought his discovery to the attention of John Hunter, who in turn reported to his brother William Hunter, who then incorporated the discovery into his "Gravid Uterus" without acknowledging either Mackenzie or his brother John
Contributor(s):
MacKenzie, Colin, 1697 or 1698-1775
Publication:
Produced: [ca. 1775?]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Manuscript text
Subject(s):
Cesarean Section
Gynecology -- education
Obstetrics -- education
Midwifery -- education
Smellie, William, 1697-1763.
Genre(s):
Lecture Notes
Abstract:
Mackenzie's lectures occupy two-thirds of the volume and consists of 22 lectures. Topics include the progress of midwifery, organs of generation, gravid uterus, pregnancy disorders, conception, natual labor, use of instruments, general rules for forceps, cases, preternatural labor, twins, narrow pelvis and puerperal fever. Discussion of the forceps and mechanisms of labor refer to William Smellie, noted physician of gynecology.
Copyright:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain. (More information)
Extent:
61 leaves
NLM Unique ID:
100954829 (See catalog record)
Biograhical Sketch:
Mackenzie was a student of William Smellie and was a consultant in the first cesarean operations in England. He also was involved in the disputed discovery of the circulatory relationship between the placenta and uterus. He brought his discovery to the attention of John Hunter, who in turn reported to his brother William Hunter, who then incorporated the discovery into his "Gravid Uterus" without acknowledging either Mackenzie or his brother John