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Pacific enemy number two, malaria

Other Title(s):
Medicine in action
Author(s):
Byron Motion Pictures.
United States. Navy
Publication Date:
1944
Publisher:
Washington, D.C. : The Navy, 1944
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
011 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Malaria -- prevention & control
Military Medicine
Mosquito Control -- methods
Pacific Islands
Instructional Films and Videos
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 9200240A (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/9200240A
Description:
This film, once restricted to viewing by authorized personnel only, outlines the way the United States military fought malaria in the islands of the South Pacific during World War II. Malaria was recognized as a major military medical problem. A coordinated triple attack against the disease in the South Pacific included medical, engineering, and entomological aspects. Entomologists were sent to the areas in question and took a careful census of the mosquito population. Illustrative footage is shown. Scientists examine mosquito larvae scooped up in water samples. Seabees then come in and blast open waterways to drain standing water, dig drainage ditches, cut down underbrush, and oil spray waters that cannot be drained. Sluice gates are built so that streams may be periodically flushed out. Screens are put up on living and working quarters and kept in good repair. Little village boys are taught to spray insecticides in their family homes. The medical officer passes out atabrine pills to the native villagers. In rainy climates, mosquitoes will breed in such man-made depressions as ruts, abandoned roads, blocked ditches, and fox and shell holes. Bulldozers then must come in and smooth over the depressions. Precautions to be taken to avoid getting malaria are given over footage of troops demonstrating good prophylactic behavior. This includes keeping their shirt sleeves rolled down and their shirts buttoned, using plenty of insect repellent on areas of exposed skin, using mosquito netting and insect spray, and taking atabrine tablets regularly. To be successful, this program had to eliminate mosquito breeding places, control malaria reservoirs in the native population, and prevent and control malaria in American troops. Shots include: a village and villagers on a Pacific island; military physicians palpating the swollen abdomens of natives; troops with malaria in sick bay in a jungle village; typical malaria breeding areas of swamps and jungles; troops on the move, in battle, and at rest in the jungle; and Headquarters Malaria Control South Pacific.
Received: (date unknown) as a donation from the U.S. Navy.
Other Title(s):
Medicine in action
Author(s):
Byron Motion Pictures.
United States. Navy
Publication Date:
1944
Publisher:
Washington, D.C. : The Navy, 1944
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
011 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Malaria -- prevention & control
Military Medicine
Mosquito Control -- methods
Pacific Islands
Instructional Films and Videos
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 9200240A
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/9200240A
Description:
This film, once restricted to viewing by authorized personnel only, outlines the way the United States military fought malaria in the islands of the South Pacific during World War II. Malaria was recognized as a major military medical problem. A coordinated triple attack against the disease in the South Pacific included medical, engineering, and entomological aspects. Entomologists were sent to the areas in question and took a careful census of the mosquito population. Illustrative footage is shown. Scientists examine mosquito larvae scooped up in water samples. Seabees then come in and blast open waterways to drain standing water, dig drainage ditches, cut down underbrush, and oil spray waters that cannot be drained. Sluice gates are built so that streams may be periodically flushed out. Screens are put up on living and working quarters and kept in good repair. Little village boys are taught to spray insecticides in their family homes. The medical officer passes out atabrine pills to the native villagers. In rainy climates, mosquitoes will breed in such man-made depressions as ruts, abandoned roads, blocked ditches, and fox and shell holes. Bulldozers then must come in and smooth over the depressions. Precautions to be taken to avoid getting malaria are given over footage of troops demonstrating good prophylactic behavior. This includes keeping their shirt sleeves rolled down and their shirts buttoned, using plenty of insect repellent on areas of exposed skin, using mosquito netting and insect spray, and taking atabrine tablets regularly. To be successful, this program had to eliminate mosquito breeding places, control malaria reservoirs in the native population, and prevent and control malaria in American troops. Shots include: a village and villagers on a Pacific island; military physicians palpating the swollen abdomens of natives; troops with malaria in sick bay in a jungle village; typical malaria breeding areas of swamps and jungles; troops on the move, in battle, and at rest in the jungle; and Headquarters Malaria Control South Pacific.
Received: (date unknown) as a donation from the U.S. Navy.