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Gonorrhea: a film for physicians in technicolor

Author(s):
Fishbein, Morris, 1889-1976
Parran, Thomas, 1892-1968
Hugh Harman Productions.
United States. Public Health Service.
Publication Date:
1943
Publisher:
[Washington, DC] : The Service, c1943
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
028 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Gonorrhea -- diagnosis
Gonorrhea -- drug therapy
Instructional Films and Videos
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 8801163A (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/8801163A
Description:
Diagnosis of gonorrhea should be done by clinical and laboratory investigation. The physician and patients are shown in the physician's office and examining room. The patients remove their clothing, and the physician takes samples from the end of the penis and makes thin smear slides from them. The techniques for stripping gonococci from male and female patients with chronic gonorrhea are shown in drawings and live footage. The physician is shown getting and preparing a urine sample for laboratory testing for the presence of gonococci, including using a hand-cranked centrifuge. The material is packaged to be sent away for laboratory diagnosis by gram stain and culture. The diagnostic laboratory and staff are shown. If the physician suspects, on the basis of his observation and the patient's history, that the patient has gonorrhea, the physician should treat it as such until definitive laboratory findings are available. A brief history of sulfanilamide treatment for gonorrhea is given. Sulfathiazole is recommended as the current drug of choice but may soon be supplanted by penicillin. The doctor-patient relationship is very important in the first interview with the suspected gonorrhea patient. The patient must be made to understand his disease and to want to continue treatment. The doctor's responsibilities and the order of treatment are illustrated in drawings. Follow-up examination for syphilis is necessary. Theuse of condoms in every sexual encounter for three months after successful treatment of gonorrhea is recommended. The doctor is shown instructing a patient in the proper use of condoms. Public education is stressed. Shots include: a physician's examining room and office; a clinical record form; a pharmaceutical laboratory and worker.
Credits: Picture adaptation, Melvin Shaw ; production management, Stafford Harrison ; scenario, Oscar Saul ; cinematography, Charles P. Boyle ; color direction, Natalie Kalmus ; film editor, Wm. J. Faris ; animation production supervision, Charles McGirl ; direction, Robert Allen ; art direction, Harold Miles ; photography, Max Ising ; direction, Richard C. Kahn ; Morris Fishbein, Thomas Parran, Jr.
Received: (date unknown) as a donation from USPHS.
NLM Permanence Rating: Permanent: Stable content
Author(s):
Fishbein, Morris, 1889-1976
Parran, Thomas, 1892-1968
Hugh Harman Productions.
United States. Public Health Service.
Publication Date:
1943
Publisher:
[Washington, DC] : The Service, c1943
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
028 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Gonorrhea -- diagnosis
Gonorrhea -- drug therapy
Instructional Films and Videos
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 8801163A
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/8801163A
Description:
Diagnosis of gonorrhea should be done by clinical and laboratory investigation. The physician and patients are shown in the physician's office and examining room. The patients remove their clothing, and the physician takes samples from the end of the penis and makes thin smear slides from them. The techniques for stripping gonococci from male and female patients with chronic gonorrhea are shown in drawings and live footage. The physician is shown getting and preparing a urine sample for laboratory testing for the presence of gonococci, including using a hand-cranked centrifuge. The material is packaged to be sent away for laboratory diagnosis by gram stain and culture. The diagnostic laboratory and staff are shown. If the physician suspects, on the basis of his observation and the patient's history, that the patient has gonorrhea, the physician should treat it as such until definitive laboratory findings are available. A brief history of sulfanilamide treatment for gonorrhea is given. Sulfathiazole is recommended as the current drug of choice but may soon be supplanted by penicillin. The doctor-patient relationship is very important in the first interview with the suspected gonorrhea patient. The patient must be made to understand his disease and to want to continue treatment. The doctor's responsibilities and the order of treatment are illustrated in drawings. Follow-up examination for syphilis is necessary. Theuse of condoms in every sexual encounter for three months after successful treatment of gonorrhea is recommended. The doctor is shown instructing a patient in the proper use of condoms. Public education is stressed. Shots include: a physician's examining room and office; a clinical record form; a pharmaceutical laboratory and worker.
Credits: Picture adaptation, Melvin Shaw ; production management, Stafford Harrison ; scenario, Oscar Saul ; cinematography, Charles P. Boyle ; color direction, Natalie Kalmus ; film editor, Wm. J. Faris ; animation production supervision, Charles McGirl ; direction, Robert Allen ; art direction, Harold Miles ; photography, Max Ising ; direction, Richard C. Kahn ; Morris Fishbein, Thomas Parran, Jr.
Received: (date unknown) as a donation from USPHS.
NLM Permanence Rating: Permanent: Stable content