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The Human Genome Project: problems and prospects

Other Title(s):
Biotechnology seminar series
Author(s):
Cantor, Charles R., 1942-
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Publication Date:
1988
Publisher:
[Bethesda, MD] : National Library of Medicine, 1988
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
101 min.
Sound
Black and white
Color
Subject(s):
Chromosome Mapping
Genes
Human Genome Project.
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 8800529A (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/8800529A
Description:
Charles Cantor presents a highly technical lecture on the human genome project. The human genome has approximately three billion base pairs which are polymorphic with a small percentage in variable positions. The steps in the analysis are the development of maps: (1) physical, (2) restriction, (3) cosmid, and (4) linkage. The cosmid map is cloned DNA arranged in order. For example, in E. coli the researcher can establish fragments and determine order. All the sequencing is currently done by hand. There is no standard nomenclature for the genetic maps, and if searching for a particular sequence, there is a 20 to 30 percent chance the clone is incorrect. Currently, the restriction maps are not linked. Dr. Cantor calls for someone to develop the computer capability to link the sequences.
Other Title(s):
Biotechnology seminar series
Author(s):
Cantor, Charles R., 1942-
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Publication Date:
1988
Publisher:
[Bethesda, MD] : National Library of Medicine, 1988
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
101 min.
Sound
Black and white
Color
Subject(s):
Chromosome Mapping
Genes
Human Genome Project.
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 8800529A
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/8800529A
Description:
Charles Cantor presents a highly technical lecture on the human genome project. The human genome has approximately three billion base pairs which are polymorphic with a small percentage in variable positions. The steps in the analysis are the development of maps: (1) physical, (2) restriction, (3) cosmid, and (4) linkage. The cosmid map is cloned DNA arranged in order. For example, in E. coli the researcher can establish fragments and determine order. All the sequencing is currently done by hand. There is no standard nomenclature for the genetic maps, and if searching for a particular sequence, there is a 20 to 30 percent chance the clone is incorrect. Currently, the restriction maps are not linked. Dr. Cantor calls for someone to develop the computer capability to link the sequences.