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Dorothy M. Smith, R.N

Other Title(s):
Distinguished leaders in nursing
Author(s):
Watts, Nell J.
Aiken, Linda H.
National Medical Audiovisual Center.
Sigma Theta Tau.
Publication Date:
1979
Publisher:
[Bethesda, Md.] : Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine ; [Atlanta : for loan by National Medical Audiovisual Center ; Washington : for sale by National Audiovisual Center], 1979
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
060 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Nursing
Smith, Dorothy M.
Biography
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 7901021A (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/7901021A
Description:
This program, one of a series on Distinguished Leaders in Nursing, presents Dorothy M. Smith, Dean Emeritus at the University of Florida College of Nursing and Staff Nurse at the Alachua General Hospital in Gainesville. Dean Smith is interviewed by Linda H. Aiken, Ph.D., Director of Research at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and a former graduate of the University of Florida College of Nursing. According to Dean Smith, there are three major events of significance for nursing education, namely: (1) the recognition by Florence Nightingale that nurses have an impact on patients' (soldiers) mortality and thus need an education, (2) the development of a biologic and social science base essential for the nurse's competence, and (3) the introduction of the clinical teacher in nursing who retains competence in the practice of nursing. Dorothy Smith has contributed personally to nursing in making the dean of nursing also function as the director of the nursing services in the teaching hospital, by introducing unit management as the ideal administrative patient-care system to foster the physician-nurse collaboration, and by presenting nursing assessment of the patient with a person rather than disease orientation. Dean Smith readily admits that many of these innovations still are controversial and need to be settled by the nursing profession. Her satisfaction as a professional nurse and teacher are derived from the patients and students whom she has helped, and the technology which she has introduced into the art of nursing.
Credits: Nell Watts, Linda H. Aiken.
Other Title(s):
Distinguished leaders in nursing
Author(s):
Watts, Nell J.
Aiken, Linda H.
National Medical Audiovisual Center.
Sigma Theta Tau.
Publication Date:
1979
Publisher:
[Bethesda, Md.] : Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine ; [Atlanta : for loan by National Medical Audiovisual Center ; Washington : for sale by National Audiovisual Center], 1979
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
060 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Nursing
Smith, Dorothy M.
Biography
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 7901021A
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/7901021A
Description:
This program, one of a series on Distinguished Leaders in Nursing, presents Dorothy M. Smith, Dean Emeritus at the University of Florida College of Nursing and Staff Nurse at the Alachua General Hospital in Gainesville. Dean Smith is interviewed by Linda H. Aiken, Ph.D., Director of Research at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and a former graduate of the University of Florida College of Nursing. According to Dean Smith, there are three major events of significance for nursing education, namely: (1) the recognition by Florence Nightingale that nurses have an impact on patients' (soldiers) mortality and thus need an education, (2) the development of a biologic and social science base essential for the nurse's competence, and (3) the introduction of the clinical teacher in nursing who retains competence in the practice of nursing. Dorothy Smith has contributed personally to nursing in making the dean of nursing also function as the director of the nursing services in the teaching hospital, by introducing unit management as the ideal administrative patient-care system to foster the physician-nurse collaboration, and by presenting nursing assessment of the patient with a person rather than disease orientation. Dean Smith readily admits that many of these innovations still are controversial and need to be settled by the nursing profession. Her satisfaction as a professional nurse and teacher are derived from the patients and students whom she has helped, and the technology which she has introduced into the art of nursing.
Credits: Nell Watts, Linda H. Aiken.