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L. T. Coggeshall, M.D

Other Title(s):
Leaders in American medicine
Author(s):
Bowers, John Z., 1913-1993
National Medical Audiovisual Center.
Alpha Omega Alpha.
Publication Date:
1975
Publisher:
[Atlanta] : The Center ; [Washington : for sale by National Audiovisual Center], 1975
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
055 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
History, 20th Century
Malaria -- history
Coggeshall, Lowell T., 1901-
Interview
Autobiography
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 7601824A (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/7601824A
Description:
This presentation presents a biographical memoir of the life and career of Dr. Lowell T. Coggeshall, Professor of Medicine and Vice President and Trustee of the University of Chicago. Dr. Coggeshall is interviewed by Dr. John Z. Bowers, President of Alpha Omega Alpha, National Honor Medical Society. In this presentation Dr. Bowers first briefly describes the series, Leaders in American Medicine. He then introduces and discusses his first meeting with Dr. Coggeshall at a lecture on malaria in 1939. Dr. Coggeshall describes his interest in malaria, which led to his study of medicine and later became a focal point in his career. After graduation from medical school he received an internship at the University of Chicago, then worked with the Rockefeller Foundation on immunity and a malaria vaccine. During World War II, his knowledge of malaria and tropical diseases led to his involvement in establishing malaria controls for personnel setting up secret air routes to China and Africa. Upon completion of his work for the Armed Forces he become Professor of Tropical Diseases and later Dean of the Biological Division at the University of Michigan. He describes his government service as an Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), now the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Dr. Coggeshall then discusses innovations and changes in medical education and federal funding of medical schools.
Other Title(s):
Leaders in American medicine
Author(s):
Bowers, John Z., 1913-1993
National Medical Audiovisual Center.
Alpha Omega Alpha.
Publication Date:
1975
Publisher:
[Atlanta] : The Center ; [Washington : for sale by National Audiovisual Center], 1975
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
055 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
History, 20th Century
Malaria -- history
Coggeshall, Lowell T., 1901-
Interview
Autobiography
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 7601824A
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/7601824A
Description:
This presentation presents a biographical memoir of the life and career of Dr. Lowell T. Coggeshall, Professor of Medicine and Vice President and Trustee of the University of Chicago. Dr. Coggeshall is interviewed by Dr. John Z. Bowers, President of Alpha Omega Alpha, National Honor Medical Society. In this presentation Dr. Bowers first briefly describes the series, Leaders in American Medicine. He then introduces and discusses his first meeting with Dr. Coggeshall at a lecture on malaria in 1939. Dr. Coggeshall describes his interest in malaria, which led to his study of medicine and later became a focal point in his career. After graduation from medical school he received an internship at the University of Chicago, then worked with the Rockefeller Foundation on immunity and a malaria vaccine. During World War II, his knowledge of malaria and tropical diseases led to his involvement in establishing malaria controls for personnel setting up secret air routes to China and Africa. Upon completion of his work for the Armed Forces he become Professor of Tropical Diseases and later Dean of the Biological Division at the University of Michigan. He describes his government service as an Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), now the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Dr. Coggeshall then discusses innovations and changes in medical education and federal funding of medical schools.