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Filariasis in British Guiana

Title(s):
Filariasis in British Guiana
Author(s):
Burton, George.
British Guiana. Ministry of Labor, Health and Housing
Filariasis Research and Control Unit (British Guiana)
British Guiana-United States of America Technical Assistance Development Organization.
United States. Agency for International Development
Publication Date:
1963
Publisher:
Georgetown, British Guiana : The Unit ; [Atlanta : for loan by National Medical Audiovisual Center ; Washington : for sale by National Audiovisual Center, 1963]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
017 min.
Sound
Black and white
Subject(s):
Filariasis -- epidemiology
Health Education
International Cooperation
Mosquito Control
Socioeconomic Factors
Guyana -- epidemiology
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 7600689A
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/7600689A
Description:
The purpose of this presentation is to explain the filariasis problem in British Guiana and to urge the cooperation of residents in the joint research and control program established by the governments of British Guiana and the United States. The work of the Technical Assistance Development Organization (TADO) is described and illustrated in detail. The epidemiological and socioeconomic factors are discussed and the treatment program is described. In this presentation clinical subjects are first presented and their lifestyle is described. The crippling effects of filaria are discussed and demonstrated. The life cycle of the filaria is then described and illustrated, and histologic slides are presented which demonstrate the presence of the parasite in the blood. The diagnostic use of the nocturnal blood smear is described and demonstrated in considerable detail. The program then focuses on the work done by individual doctors, and the later research and control work of TADO is illustrated. The use of posters, pamphlets, lectures, conferences, and discussion groups in efforts to educate the public in the epidemiological and therapeutic aspects of this disease is discussed. The work of the night survey teams that go from house to house collecting blood samples from each member of the family and the work of the epidemiological teams in collecting mosquitoes for examination and spraying breeding places are presented in detail. The therapeutic use of several antihelminthic drugs is also discussed and described.
Title(s):
Filariasis in British Guiana
Author(s):
Burton, George.
British Guiana. Ministry of Labor, Health and Housing
Filariasis Research and Control Unit (British Guiana)
British Guiana-United States of America Technical Assistance Development Organization.
United States. Agency for International Development
Publication Date:
1963
Publisher:
Georgetown, British Guiana : The Unit ; [Atlanta : for loan by National Medical Audiovisual Center ; Washington : for sale by National Audiovisual Center, 1963]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
017 min.
Sound
Black and white
Subject(s):
Filariasis -- epidemiology
Health Education
International Cooperation
Mosquito Control
Socioeconomic Factors
Guyana -- epidemiology
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 7600689A
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/7600689A
Description:
The purpose of this presentation is to explain the filariasis problem in British Guiana and to urge the cooperation of residents in the joint research and control program established by the governments of British Guiana and the United States. The work of the Technical Assistance Development Organization (TADO) is described and illustrated in detail. The epidemiological and socioeconomic factors are discussed and the treatment program is described. In this presentation clinical subjects are first presented and their lifestyle is described. The crippling effects of filaria are discussed and demonstrated. The life cycle of the filaria is then described and illustrated, and histologic slides are presented which demonstrate the presence of the parasite in the blood. The diagnostic use of the nocturnal blood smear is described and demonstrated in considerable detail. The program then focuses on the work done by individual doctors, and the later research and control work of TADO is illustrated. The use of posters, pamphlets, lectures, conferences, and discussion groups in efforts to educate the public in the epidemiological and therapeutic aspects of this disease is discussed. The work of the night survey teams that go from house to house collecting blood samples from each member of the family and the work of the epidemiological teams in collecting mosquitoes for examination and spraying breeding places are presented in detail. The therapeutic use of several antihelminthic drugs is also discussed and described.