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Visible woman

Author(s):
Visible Human Project (National Library of Medicine (U.S.))
Publication Date:
1997
Publisher:
[Bethesda, Md. : National Library of Medicine, 1997]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
007 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Anatomy, Cross-Sectional
Models, Anatomic
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 101151419 (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/101151419
Description:
The Visible Human Project began with the Visible Man. This video is about the Visible Woman, an unidentified caucasian woman who died at 59 of a heart attack. Dr. Victor Spitzer of the University of Colorado, the project director, accepted the cadaver and filmed it with a 3-D MRI. The body was then frozen and sliced into 5,189 paper-thin layers as compared to 1,878 layers for the Visibile Man. The result is a virtual 3-D human. Dr. Michael Ackerman, project liaison for the National Library of Medicine, describes how the project originated and its purpose. A high school teacher in Colorado explains how he uses the Visible Human in class, and his students report on their impressions. Greg Andorfer, Director of the Maryland Science Center, wants to set up an exhibit on the Visible Woman to accompany that of the Visible Man at the Science Center.
Author(s):
Visible Human Project (National Library of Medicine (U.S.))
Publication Date:
1997
Publisher:
[Bethesda, Md. : National Library of Medicine, 1997]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
007 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Anatomy, Cross-Sectional
Models, Anatomic
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 101151419
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/101151419
Description:
The Visible Human Project began with the Visible Man. This video is about the Visible Woman, an unidentified caucasian woman who died at 59 of a heart attack. Dr. Victor Spitzer of the University of Colorado, the project director, accepted the cadaver and filmed it with a 3-D MRI. The body was then frozen and sliced into 5,189 paper-thin layers as compared to 1,878 layers for the Visibile Man. The result is a virtual 3-D human. Dr. Michael Ackerman, project liaison for the National Library of Medicine, describes how the project originated and its purpose. A high school teacher in Colorado explains how he uses the Visible Human in class, and his students report on their impressions. Greg Andorfer, Director of the Maryland Science Center, wants to set up an exhibit on the Visible Woman to accompany that of the Visible Man at the Science Center.