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Seeing diseases: visual sources and the meaning of history

Other Title(s):
NLM historical lecture
Author(s):
Gilman, Sander L.
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Publication Date:
1990
Publisher:
Bethesda, Md. : National Library of Medicine, 1990
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
056 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Medicine in Art
Mental Disorders -- history
Disease -- psychology
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 100961750 (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/100961750
Description:
During this lecture on "images as cultural history," Dr. Sander Gilman traces the changes in visual representations of persons who are diseased from the eighteenth century through the twentieth century. He focuses on the imagery of psychiatric illness using an array of paintings, lithographs, drawings, and illustrations. Beginning with Hogarth's "The rake's progress" (18th century) and concluding with images representing persons with AIDS, Dr. Gilman provides provocative reasons for using images to study changes in perceptions of health and disease over time.
Credits: Sander Gilman.
Other Title(s):
NLM historical lecture
Author(s):
Gilman, Sander L.
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Publication Date:
1990
Publisher:
Bethesda, Md. : National Library of Medicine, 1990
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
056 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Medicine in Art
Mental Disorders -- history
Disease -- psychology
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 100961750
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/100961750
Description:
During this lecture on "images as cultural history," Dr. Sander Gilman traces the changes in visual representations of persons who are diseased from the eighteenth century through the twentieth century. He focuses on the imagery of psychiatric illness using an array of paintings, lithographs, drawings, and illustrations. Beginning with Hogarth's "The rake's progress" (18th century) and concluding with images representing persons with AIDS, Dr. Gilman provides provocative reasons for using images to study changes in perceptions of health and disease over time.
Credits: Sander Gilman.