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The diagnosis of syphilis by the general practitioner: the diagnosis of early syphilis primary stage

Other Title(s):
Syphilis
Diagnosis of late syphilis
Syphilis
Author(s):
Bowen, Carroll T. (Carroll Thomas), 1904-
Usher, Glenn S.
Cole, Harold N.
United States. Public Health Service.
Publication Date:
1943
Publisher:
[Washington, DC] : The Service, [1943]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
015 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Syphilis -- diagnosis
Instructional Films and Videos
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
NLMUID: 100890932 (See catalog record)
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/100890932
Description:
Primary stage: The characteristic lesions of early syphilis are shown on the penises of infected men and in the genital area of women. Gloved hands palpate a penis for interior chancre; a woman is vaginally examined with the aid of a speculum and a cervical sample is taken with a swab. Lip and finger chancres are shown. Non-syphilitic lesions of the penis are shown. Diagnosis by repeated blood tests of all persons with suspect lesions is required. The taking of a smear for dark field examination is shown. The spirochaeta is shown under the microscope on a dark field. The taking and preparing for shipment of a dark field specimen is shown. The conditions under which false negatives occur are discussed. A positive dark field exam indicates syphilis even when the blood test is negative. The time sequence for the appearance of symptoms and pathology of syphilis is given in graphics. Secondary stage: The organism is disseminated throughout the body. The following symptoms are shown: Malaise is felt; bones and joints ache; lymphadenopathies, sore throat, macular syphilids (salmon or rose colored) which can be seen under blue light if not daylight, secondary, often papular syphilids, falling out of the hair, mucus patches in the mouth, nose, or on the genitalia may be present. Venereal warts are shown. Split papules, often the only sign of secondary syphilis, are shown. Iritis should indicate that the physician use atropine and then do a blood test. The symptoms and signs of early meningeal neurosyphilis are demonstrated on a patient in a hospital bed. The taking of blood for syphilis serodiagnosis is shown in detail. Congenital syphilis and control of syphilis are discussed.
Credits: Clinical photography, Carroll T. Bowen ; medical direction, Glenn S. Usher ; general direction, W. Allen Leuy ; production, Howard Ennes ; medical consultants, Harold N. Cole, Joseph E. Moore, Paul A. O'Leary, Thomas Parran, Francis E. Senear, John H. Stokes, Lida J. Usilton, Raymond A. Vonderlehr.
Received: date unknown; donation; United States Public Health Service.
NLM Permanence Rating: Permanent: Stable content
Other Title(s):
Syphilis
Diagnosis of late syphilis
Syphilis
Author(s):
Bowen, Carroll T. (Carroll Thomas), 1904-
Usher, Glenn S.
Cole, Harold N.
United States. Public Health Service.
Publication Date:
1943
Publisher:
[Washington, DC] : The Service, [1943]
Language(s):
English
Format:
Moving image
015 min.
Sound
Color
Subject(s):
Syphilis -- diagnosis
Instructional Films and Videos
Rights:
The National Library of Medicine believes this item to be in the public domain.
Identifier(s):
See catalog record: 100890932
Permanent Link:
http://resource.nlm.nih.gov/100890932
Description:
Primary stage: The characteristic lesions of early syphilis are shown on the penises of infected men and in the genital area of women. Gloved hands palpate a penis for interior chancre; a woman is vaginally examined with the aid of a speculum and a cervical sample is taken with a swab. Lip and finger chancres are shown. Non-syphilitic lesions of the penis are shown. Diagnosis by repeated blood tests of all persons with suspect lesions is required. The taking of a smear for dark field examination is shown. The spirochaeta is shown under the microscope on a dark field. The taking and preparing for shipment of a dark field specimen is shown. The conditions under which false negatives occur are discussed. A positive dark field exam indicates syphilis even when the blood test is negative. The time sequence for the appearance of symptoms and pathology of syphilis is given in graphics. Secondary stage: The organism is disseminated throughout the body. The following symptoms are shown: Malaise is felt; bones and joints ache; lymphadenopathies, sore throat, macular syphilids (salmon or rose colored) which can be seen under blue light if not daylight, secondary, often papular syphilids, falling out of the hair, mucus patches in the mouth, nose, or on the genitalia may be present. Venereal warts are shown. Split papules, often the only sign of secondary syphilis, are shown. Iritis should indicate that the physician use atropine and then do a blood test. The symptoms and signs of early meningeal neurosyphilis are demonstrated on a patient in a hospital bed. The taking of blood for syphilis serodiagnosis is shown in detail. Congenital syphilis and control of syphilis are discussed.
Credits: Clinical photography, Carroll T. Bowen ; medical direction, Glenn S. Usher ; general direction, W. Allen Leuy ; production, Howard Ennes ; medical consultants, Harold N. Cole, Joseph E. Moore, Paul A. O'Leary, Thomas Parran, Francis E. Senear, John H. Stokes, Lida J. Usilton, Raymond A. Vonderlehr.
Received: date unknown; donation; United States Public Health Service.
NLM Permanence Rating: Permanent: Stable content